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Powerful Learning Communities

 

OLE is working with innovators and their governments in the developing world to transform their villages and cities, and ultimately their entire nation, into powerful learning communities. We emphasize team-based coaching, open source content and frequent sharing of information using a low cost digital library network that works off the Internet with locally-generated power.  These approaches for learning are affordable and scalable, benefiting even those living in remote villages. 

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“Healthy Rwanda” Brings Public and Environmental Health into the Classroom

By:  Kelly Manser, Communications and Development Intern
 
Some believe that what you learn in elementary school is irrelevant to the real world. Thanks to Open Learning Exchange (OLE) Rwanda, 10,000 Rwandan public school students will never know that feeling; they won’t pay a cent for the knowledge they gain, either. In April 2013, OLE Rwanda launched Healthy Rwanda, a digital literacy and health education project based in the country’s capital city of Kigali.
 
What does Healthy Rwanda entail, exactly?

People, Content and Tools: A Pathway Toward Quality Learning For All

on Thu, 05/30/2013 - 16:10

By: Richard Rowe, Chair and CEO of Open Learning Exchange

It is now clear that ensuring quality learning for everyone requires major innovations in our education systems. With few exceptions, we have failed in our responsibility to enable our two billion school-aged children to enjoy a quality basic education, enabling them to read, do simple math and earn a livelihood. It is also clear that, while increased investments are required, just pouring more money into doing the same things we have been doing will not change outcomes very much.

"People, Content and Tools"

A Pathway Towards Quality Learning For All

- Richard Rowe

It is now clear that ensuring quality learning for everyone requires major innovations in our education systems. With few exceptions, we have failed in our responsibility to enable our two billion school-aged children to enjoy a quality basic education, enabling them to read, do simple math and earn a livelihood. It is also clear that, while increased investments are required, just pouring more money into doing the same things we have been doing will not change outcomes very much.